Shakey Graves
Thu Sep 22
Outside

Shakey Graves

with The Ballroom Thieves

DATE: Thursday, September 22, 2022
DOORS: 5:00 PM
STARTS: 6:30 PM
LIVE ON THE OUTDOOR STAGE
Genre: Alternative/Indie
Age Limit: Must be 12 or Older
RAIN OR SHINE; NO REFUNDS; LARGE EVENT PARKING
Price: $35 ADV; $40 DOS (General Admission)
Buy Tickets

Shakey Graves (with The Ballroom Thieves) will be performing LIVE on the Outdoor Stage at Salvage Station on Thursday, September 22nd! Doors open at 5:00PM and the music starts at 6:30PM. This is a General Admission, 12+ ONLY show (no exceptions)! This is a LARGE EVENT, so please read our FAQs to learn more about parking options and our shuttle service.

Root Down will be serving their delicious twist on Southern Soul food and we’ll have a few rotating food trucks on-site as well! There will also be MULTIPLE full bars open for you to enjoy! 

CDC guidelines + band requirements + our venue policies are subject to change daily, so please keep your eyes on https://salvagestation.com/covid-policy/ for updates. We do not issue refunds based on our Covid-19 policies and reserve the right to change them at any time.

Check out our FAQ page here to learn about large event parking options, what you can and cannot bring inside the venue, and MORE!

LISTEN TO SHAKEY GRAVES:

ABOUT SHAKEY GRAVES:

The prehistory of Shakey Graves exists in two overstuffed folders. Inside them, artifacts document an immense era of anonymous DIY creativity, from 2007 through 2010 – the three years before ​Roll The Bones​ came out and changed his life.

There are stencils, lyrics, drawings, prototypes for concert posters, and even a zine. The latter, which Graves – aka Alejandro Rose-Garcia – wrote and illustrated, tells the tale of a once-courageous, now retired mouse who must journey to the moon to save his sweetheart. At the time, he envisioned the photocopied storybook as a potential vessel for releasing his music.

“There was a lot of conceptualizing going on – trying to figure out what I wanted stuff to look like, sound like, and be like,” Rose-Garcia recalls, shuffling through the physical files on his second-story deck in South Austin. “And, honestly, a lot of trying to keep myself from going crazy.”

In this lode of unreleased ephemera, CD-Rs are the most bountiful element. There are dozens of burned discs with widely varying track lists, loosely resembling what would become the Austin native’s 2011 breakout debut ​Roll the Bones.​ For Rose-Garcia, who’s long loved the incongruous art form of sequencing strange mixtapes for friends, his own record was subject to change every time he burned a disc for somebody. Consistency didn’t matter, he asserts, because there was no demand or expectations.

Thus ​Roll the Bones​ was by no means a Big Bang creation story, rather a years-long process of metamorphosis where literally hundreds of tracks were winnowed down into ten. As the album took shape, he began manufacturing one-off editions of the CD, stapled to self-destruct in brown paper, with black and white photographs glued upon them, and an ink pen marking of the artist’s enduring logo: a skull struck by an arrow.

“I liked that if they were opened, you couldn’t close them again,” he smiles. “Sometimes I’d spray paint the CD so they looked good and people would stick them in their car stereo and it would fuse in and never come out. They’d tell me, ‘You’re lucky I like this record because it’s the last one I’ll ever be able to listen to in my car.’”

In the shadows self-doubt that surrounds any artists first record, Rose-Garcia had a fantasy: he releases ​Roll the Bones,​ only ten people hear it, it’s rediscovered a decade later by Numero Group, hailed as before-its-time, and finds an audience as a lost treasure. He still plays that scenario through his mind like an alternative reality.

Of course, that’s far from what actually materialized. ​Roll the Bones​ was released on the first day of 2011 without a lick of promotion advancing it. It was simply thrust into the world as a decapod of perplexingly memorable, narrative-wrapped songs with a mysterious cover and no information about the artist… only available on the relatively new platform of Bandcamp.

That year, an editor at Bandcamp made it a featured album for a month and from there it stayed in the website’s top selling folk albums evermore. The record has since seen well over 100,000 units sold – even while being available for free download. In the “Supported By” section of the ​Roll the Bones​ Bandcamp page, you can endlessly click “more” and squares of avatars will keep showing up until you grow tired and stop.

“If you discover something for yourself, it will always hold more water because it’s tied to memory and coincidence,” Rose-Garcia reasons as to why he never pushed ​Roll the Bones​ onto a wider marketplace. “It gives you a sense of ownership as a listener.”

Now fans can obtain ​Roll the Bones​ as their own physical artifact. Through Dualtone Records, Shakey Graves will release a ​Ten Year Special Edition​ double LP with a black and gold foil re-arting of the taxidermied cow head cover. Separate iterations, hitting record collections on April 2, offer the 180g vinyl in a black and gold combination or two marbled “galaxy gold” discs. The lovingly assembled packaging includes handwritten deep explanations of every song, offset with original photography.

Along with its deluxe vinyl emergence, ​Roll the Bones​ today becomes available through all digital service providers – Spotify, Apple Music, YouTube, et all. For the last decade, the songs have lived exclusively on Bandcamp. This full-spectrum digital release arrives concurrent with Shakey Graves Day, which was minted on February 9, 2012 by Austin Mayor Steve Adler. Year one, Rose-Garcia spent what he calls his “alter ego’s birthday,” as an excuse to go play laser tag. Ever since, he’s used it as an occasion to stage intimate pop-up shows and open up the attics of his discography – making all of his albums, plus hundreds of unheard songs temporarily available for free.

“I’ve used Shakey Graves Day as a challenge to myself,” he assesses. “I make so many random songs throughout the year that I either forget about or I’m too nervous to put on an album and it becomes a clearinghouse for that. It surprises me when people tell me that something released that day is their favorite of my stuff. In a larger sense, it builds off what I initially did with ​Roll the Bones –​ which is give it away for free.”

Accompanying ​Roll the Bones​ anniversary pressing are 15 additional tracks comprising an ​Odds + Ends​ LP, which stands as an essential document of Grave’s early era. Highlights include the mandolin imbued “Chinatown,” which sounds like it could be dubbed off a 1930’s silver screen soundtrack, and “Saving Face” – a seminal version of what would become ​Roll the Bones​ title cut. The crown jewel, however, may be a the first ever proper recording of the trifling love song “Late July,” a version that’s drastically different than the live rendition that’s racked 14 million views on YouTube.

Prepping ​Roll the Bones​ thoughtful 2021 edition gave Rose-Garcia an opportunity to take a new look at the person.

“I hear someone who felt really trapped,” he reveals. “In a lot of ways it was a breakup record. My first serious relationship had fallen apart and I was wanting to break up with my life – run away, be transient, and figure out who I was in the world. I can hear myself blaming the girl and trying to support myself, like maybe it’s okay to be dirty and crazy and have blinders on. Then, at the end, everything’s zooming back in and I’m saying ‘I guess I just got hurt and I’m in a bit of pain and, you know, it’s going to be okay.’”

Claiming he’s “further confused” listeners with each release, Rose-Garcia believes this purge of early output will provide some needed framing for his discography. It’s his genesis story, before he had the studio time to make the shiny ​And the War Came​ or the full-band cohesion to make the painstakingly dense ​Can’t Wake Up​. To him, it’s a scrappy effort, but the most intentional work he’s ever produced – and, a decade later, he wouldn’t change a thing.

“It’s a record that sounds like my years of exploration and influence, funneled through my abilities at the time – and it all became something bigger,” he muses. “If you would’ve offered to me: ‘Let’s do ​exactly​ what you want, right now” ​Roll the Bones​ wouldn’t have come out like this… and I’m happy that’s the case. Total control is an unhealthy myth, it leaves out the emotional side of how all the accidents come together. This record’s a period of time smashed into a single product and, in my own heart, it’s a moral compass: to always get back to feeling like this about the songs I make.”

LISTEN TO THE BALLROOM THIEVES:

ABOUT THE BALLROOM THIEVES:

Early in 2020, an article was released declaring that the music industry needed more happy songs. As Martin Earley and Calin Peters recall, they laughed while reading it, knowing that their work as The Ballroom Thieves explores the spirit of that paradigm. Well, sort of…they’re not interested in easily defined worldviews.

We read that article and thought, ‘how are we supposed to write happy songs right now?’” says Earley. “We don’t write happy songs, but this time we decided to try something new by pairing optimistic sounding music with dark lyrics. If the listener is not a lyrics person, they might not notice.”

The Ballroom Thieves’ fourth album, Clouds, is a song cycle born of mixed experiences and fueled by the power of imagination. The album is a lush meditation on longing to return to touring – to see different sunsets and cities. But, it’s also a reflection of its difficulties, e.g., insomnia brought on by sleeping in different hotel rooms every night. After a major car accident and the departure of a band member, the duo has taken the duality of all these experiences and translated them into song.

We miss exploring the country,” says Peters. “The road offers us structure and it gives us something to write about. These past two years we learned just how much we love and need it.

As they leaned into their wanderlust, themes became apparent – the idea of a life spent in motion (“Shine“), the power of the storm representing a relationship transformed into heartbreak (“The Lightning“), Man’s ceaseless degradation of resources and Nature’s inevitable fury (“Worldender“), and Harry Styles (“Harry Styles“), who should be considered a force of Nature as far as Peters and Earley are concerned. “We were sitting around our woodstove, and Callie looked over at me and said, ‘I think I’m in love with Harry Styles,’” Earley recalls. “And my first thought was, ‘wait a minute, I love Harry Styles! You can’t have him!’”

Clouds became an opportunity for the band to mine the challenges of the past three years for creative inspiration. 

We were able to step away from a lot of the big three-part harmonies and for the first time we recorded most of the album live,” says Earley. “We try to let change inspire us, even when it comes with difficulty.”

It’s an artistic statement that doubles as a life mission. The pair both emphasize that they’ve learned to navigate complicated situations, including their struggles with depression, which often colors their songs. If they can impart anything to listeners, it’s that talking about mental health is not a weakness—and that sharing any of life’s trials can be a source of strength.   

There’s so much material out there on fighting mental illnesses and keeping our heads up but I think it’s also just important to know that it’s okay to be affected. The human experience can be ugly and difficult and it’s okay to feel things deeply,” says Peters. “Not every day has to be seized.”

“I’m so glad it’s more common for people to talk openly about depression these days, because it can be tough when you think you’re the only one feeling it,” adds Earley. “We figured if it helps us when others are candid about their experiences with mental illness, maybe it’ll help someone else if we do the same.”

Clouds will be released on July 15 via Nettwerk Records.



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